LUCRA LC470 Lineage

The LC470 may be all modern, but it gets its good looks from a different era. The LC470’s race bred lineage goes back to mid 50s during the golden age of road racing. In Britain during this time a young man with a passion for racing and an engineering background embarked on creating the perfect racer. As such, a car known as the “Lister” was born, and it is from this car that the LUCRA LC470 takes much of its styling cues.

Brian Lister was a young man being groomed to take over the family business, but his passions lied elsewhere. In the early 1950’s the young Lister had discovered racing and his background in the family’s engineering firm sparked the idea that he could build and drive his very own race car. However his first attempts at both reached only marginal success. His initial concept married a Tojiero chassis with the British J.A.P. motorcycle racing engine, and although it was fairly quick, it proved temperamental. Additionally, Brian’s love of racing didn’t translate to the innate skill needed to adequately drive well enough to be a professional racer. However, in 1953 he met an unlikely driver who contrary to serious physical maladies did posses the natural skills and abilities needed.

Archie Scott Brown was a Scotsman with tremendous determination and will to succeed despite substantial birth defects. While pregnant his mother had contracted  Rubella and the disease resulted in Archie being born with no shinbones, tiny club feet which pointed backwards and to the side, and a short right arm with a palm just below the elbow. These physical disadvantages seemingly had no adverse affect however, as Archie was both quite a hit with the ladies and eventually became one of the most recognized racers of his era. His fearless driving style and uncanny sense of balance were a sight to behold as he would regularly have his car completely sideways in the turns, only regaining control and exiting the turns just in the nick of time.

With the engineering know-how of Brian Lister and the talented driving of Archie Scott Brown a partnership was formed. And  a winning combination at that, as they took  top honors in many a small and club-level racing event. However, they both knew if they were to progress, then the car would need improvement. So with a little coercion Lister’s father loaned the pair £1500 to develop a proper race car, as a means to showcase the family business’ engineering abilities of course. The result was a vastly improved Lister race car, and thus many a successful race was won. The car’s popularity grew once other racers saw how well Scott Brown performed in the Lister, and the decision was made to produce them to be sold in kit form so as to reduce any potential liability of the Lister parent company.

The first proper Lister was produced in 1954 and for that time featured an advanced ladder frame and suspension. Initial powerplants included MGs and Maseratis, but it was the Lister and Jaguar combination that was most notable. A successful London business man commissioned a Lister but insisted it be fitted with a new Jaguar engine and gearbox. Lister was reluctant, but obliged and the combination proved quite effective. Soon after,  the factory racing team of Jaguar announced they were quitting and their old sponsor British Petroleum offered to support a new Lister team if they promised to use the Jaguar engine. Thus Lister-Jaguar was born and its  simple all aluminum body was sleek, stylish, and proved to be a winner. Over the next few years the Lister became quite popular with racers and could be found in events across Europe. The Lister had earned quite a name for itself and soon orders came in from across the pond as well.

In America,  customers were enamored with the already proven machine and the Lister became the racer chassis and body of choice, dominating the late 1950’s and early 60’s. Soon they began outfitting the Lister with Chevy V8s. The Lister-Chevy’s had unheard of ratios of horsepower to weight,  with a 283 cubic inch V8 delivering 400hp in a 2,100 lbs car. This horsepower to weight ratio turned in quarter mile times in just over ten seconds and clocked 0-60mph in about half of that. Not to mention is smooth and sleek shape was like nothing else on the road or track.

The Lister holds a special place in racing history and it’s easy to see the modern day Lister relative, the LUCRA LC470 carries the torch in style.

LUCRA LC470

Luke Richard’s passion for high performance automobiles and classic sports cars eventually led to him founding Lucra Cars in 2006. Lucra Cars manufactures the high performance LC470 sports car, a shockingly fast and nimble machine that is more than capable on the track and plenty comfortable to enjoy driving on the street.The timeless styling coupled with an exhilarating driving experience make the LC470 one of the top high performance sports cars available on the market today.

More about the LUCRA LC470 »

SPORTS CAR PERFECTION

Man’s love affair with machine is a strong bond, but usually fleeting. Some sports cars have the looks, but don’t perform well, or aren’t reliable. Other exotic autos drive nicely enough, but the visceral attraction is lacking and all too often you’re left wanting more. Most driving enthusiasts can attest to how difficult it is to find the perfect automobile, an attainable car with the perfect mix of style and drivability.


More about the story behind LUCRA »

FAMOUS LINEAGE

The LC470 may be all modern, but it gets its good looks from a different era. The LC470’s race bred lineage goes back to mid ‘50s during the golden age of road racing. In Britain during this time a young man with a passion for racing and an engineering background embarked on creating the perfect racer. As such, a car known as the “Lister” was born, and it is from this car that the LUCRA LC470 takes much of its styling cues.


More about its history »

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • email
  • Google Buzz